Helping to Move People and Places out of Poverty

Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation

  • Meet our new Program Associate

    The Babcock Foundation is pleased to welcome Taylor Chapman as our newest program associate. Chapman will provide programmatic and administrative support for MRBF’s network officers, and guidance to current and potential grantee partners.

    Chapman comes to the Foundation from the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she served as a...

    Taylor Chapman
  • We Stand with the Dreamers: Our Statement on DACA

    The Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation strongly opposes plans to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which enables 800,000 young people to study and work in the United States without fear of deportation.

    Often called “dreamers,” the youth enrolled in DACA were brought here as children; for many, America is the only country they’ve ever known. Rescinding...

    Alabama Coalition for Immigrant Justice
  • Confronting Hate: Our Statement on Charlottesville

    The board and staff of the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation denounce, in the strongest terms, the racism and anti-Semitism surfacing across the country. While the violence in Charlottesville has rightly drawn the world’s attention and scorn, subtle, socially acceptable forms of everyday bigotry are also nefarious in their hobbling effects on opportunity, dignity and humanity.

    We grieve...

  • Congratulations to our new and returning grantee partners

    Congratulations to the following organizations, which received funding Summer 2017:

    Advocates for Community and Rural Education (Rural Community Alliance)

    Alabama Possible

    Anderson Interfaith Ministries

    Arkansas Public Policy Panel

    Center for Heirs' Property Preservation

    Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

    Central Appalachian Network

    ...

  • Investing in Opportunity: Georgia’s Civic Engagement Network

    Like much of the South, Georgia is a racially diverse state rapidly growing even more so. Thanks in part to booming immigrant and refugee populations, it is projected to become majority-minority by 2025. And like its neighbors, Georgia has more than its share of challenges, including political representation that is not truly representative and persistent poverty, which is most acute in rural...

    Georgia STAND-UP